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Hydro Fire Hornet 2020

Lucas
Age 9Sunderland, UK

This idea has been made real

Billingham, Durham, UK

I am an electronics engineer, this is my speciality but I enjoy experimenting with all kinds of making including 3D printing. I am an active member at Teesside Hackspace, a community run workshop where we make all kinds of weird and wonderful inventions. My involvement with little makers has been a collaboration with fellow Teesside Hackspace member Chris Corbett.

2 made real

The Hydro Fire Hornet is a drone that flies up and carries water to the top of tall buildings if there is fire. Lucas wanted to help firefighters stay safe and protect people in the buildings. Lucas wanted to help after seeing the bushfires in Australia that were in the news, making him think of the Grenfell Tower fire. He wanted to find a way to avoid such disasters in the future.

Maker blog entries

Andrew Smithson has been working on making this idea real.
Making the fire engine
Posted by Andrew Smithson

We made a fire engine and building following the style of some of Lucas' drawings to keep things as close to his invention as possible.

A highlight of the project was seeing the water squirt form the flying drone directly onto the burning building model.

3D printing
Posted by Andrew Smithson

The use of 3D printing was a tremendous help for the project, 3D printing ment we could turn the computer drawing into a real functional part in just a few clicks. Although the Hackspace was closed for the pandemic, Chris has 3D printers at home so we were still able to produce the drone parts.

Using CAD
Posted by Andrew Smithson

The use of CAD was a great tool for the project, it meant we could be sure all the parts would fit together before we made it and meant assembly went smoothly.

First thoughts
Posted by Andrew Smithson

I was attracted to this project as I have built drones before but never mixed drones with fire. It is a great idea, the drone we built for the project was fully functional and we were able to demonstrate it by putting out a fire. whilst a larger fire would require more water it would be relatively simple to scale up.